Seasonal checklists, emergency prep, security, green items  — who doesn’t like checking off items from a list?

Sources of information include but are not limited to: Maple Leaf Ace Hardware crew, WSU King County Extension Master Gardener, Ed Hume Seeds, Hometime, Money Magazine, City of Seattle, King County, Plant Amnesty, “Gardening Month by Month in Washington & Oregon,” The National Gardener’s Association, Mountain Valley Growers, Cedar Grove, Whitney Farms, Scotts, The National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service, Seattle Tilth, and other links on our website.

SPRINGTIME checklists (February/March/April/May)

Click here for printable Springtime Seasonal Checklist

Springtime Home/Lawn/Garden issues & maintenance:

checkoff-box  Interior paint & prep work*

checkoff-box Daylight savings in March: change smoke and carbon monoxide detector batteries

checkoff-box  Furnace filter change every three months

checkoff-box  Water filters (sink, refrigerator, shower): change as necessary and directed

checkoff-box  Check for moisture in your basement

checkoff-box  Is your sump pump working?

checkoff-box  Clean/repair gutters & downspouts

checkoff-box  Inspect & repair roof damage

checkoff-box  Seal attic and crawl space cracks and gaps

checkoff-box  Repair screen windows & doors

checkoff-box  Replace broken window glass pane

checkoff-box  Porch and deck cleaning, repairing, painting, and staining

checkoff-box  We’ll sharpen your garden tools or replace with new

checkoff-box  We’ll sharpen your lawn mower blade

checkoff-box  Lawn care: apply fertilizer and — as necessary — aerate, dethatch, and overseed, all once the soil warms up

checkoff-box  Cultivate veggie beds: test your soil with a soil test kit and add compost, lime, fertilizer, manure, peat moss, coconut coir, as needed, to amend your garden soil

checkoff-box  Make hydrangeas blue with an application of Aluminum Sulfate in March/April (and October/November) – blue hydrangeas like acid soil (pH of 4.0 to 5.5)

checkoff-box  Pruning throughout yard: apple and pear trees in late January/February; pines, evergreens (juniper, conifer, cypress), flowering trees (after bloom), clematis, lilac suckers from February through May; hybrid tea roses, floribunda roses, climbing roses, tree roses, hydrangeas, ornamental grasses, and shade trees in February/March; and lavender in May

Click here for printable Springtime Seasonal Checklist

To-Do “tool” checklist:

checkoff-box  Interior paint & prep supplies

checkoff-box  Batteries for Daylight Savings

checkoff-box  Furnace filters

checkoff-box  Box fans for ventilation

checkoff-box  Exterior paint & prep supplies*

checkoff-box  Deck & fence stain

checkoff-box  Moss control: roofs, walks, yards

checkoff-box  Pruners

checkoff-box  Dolomite Lime for lawn, if necessary (raise pH to 6 or 7)

checkoff-box  Lawn fertilizer w/moss control, organic lawn fertilizer, & garden fertilizer

checkoff-box  Soil test kit

checkoff-box  Hand weeding tools, knee pads, gloves

checkoff-box  Organic garden, flower, and/or vegetable fertilizer

checkoff-box  Rose fertilizer (also good for lilacs)

checkoff-box  Netting for berry vines

checkoff-box  Ladybugs (good for aphid control)

checkoff-box  Nematodes (good for crane fly larva control)

checkoff-box  Sluggo Slug Bait

checkoff-box  Plant stakes

checkoff-box   Tomato cages

checkoff-box  Seedling starter supplies (Mini Greenhouse kit, Seedling/Potting mix, seeds**, labels, watering can, and light source. Optional: timer, hooks & chains)

Print out your own handy “Seedling-starter_br” info sheet for more thorough details

 

Simple Seedling Starting

Start your own seedlings and you can control if your plants are raised organically from the beginning.

Why start your own seedlings?

Save Money
•    A pack of lettuce seeds costs less than a single head of lettuce. And a pack of seeds planted successively produces lettuce most of the summer.
•    You can re-use the majority of the Seedling Starter Supplies every year — sustainability!

More Control
•    You choose exactly what types of fertilizers and pesticides go into your food and flowers because . . . well, it’s all in your hands.
•    A seed rack offers considerably more variety than in starters found in garden centers.

Health & Personal Satisfaction
•    Freshly picked vegetables straight from your garden are more healthy and more flavorful.
•    Not only do you get a greater appreciation in growing your own food . . . Not only do you get bragging right to your co-workers, friends, & family . . .  Not only can you get some recommended exercise (research shows thirty minutes of gardening per day will help increase flexibility; strengthen joints; decrease blood pressure and cholesterol levels; lower your risk for diabetes; and slow osteoporosis.) . . .  Not only can you get a better connection to the earth . . . BUT it is FUN!

 

Seedling Starter Supplies

ContainersAny container 2″ to 3″ deep with drainage holes will work. Small pots for initial planting and  2″ to 4″ pots for repotting at 4 to 8 weeks.
Holding trayA tray that will hold your seedling containers & water.
Watering deviceA watering can is good; a spray bottle to mist is useful.
Grower’s mix (aka Seed Starters mix)A lighter than regular soil mix allows seedlings to germinate (emerge) easier
SeedsAlways read seed package for specific instructions. (Surefire vegetables/herbs include basil, green beans, chives, brussel sprouts, cabbage, lettuce, onions, pumpkins, squash, and tomatoes. Reliable annual flowers are alyssum, cosmos, marigolds, and zinnias. Reliable perennials include Shasta daisies, columbines, and hollyhocks.)  
LabelsTrays will shift around, plants will get mixed up, memories will fail. Make your life easier — label.
Light sourceA shop fluorescent bulb lighting system works good. Use one cool bulb and one warm bulb for the optimal light.
Light timer (optional, but really helpful)
Chains & Hooks (optional, but really helpful)
Plant Heating Mat (optional)
Plastic bag or plastic sheeting (optional)

 

Seedling Starter Guidelines

Growing Area location
A spare bedroom, basement, or sun porch make a good growing area. Aim for a room temperature of 60° to 75°. If your room is on the cold side, you can use a plant heating pad if you wish, but only use it until the sprouts appear. Caution: Only use heating mats certified for seed starting use.  If your growing area is consistently between 60° to 75°, this mat may be an extravagance.

Prepping & Choosing
Start with something like a Mini Greenhouse Seed Starter Tray — it provides a planting flat, a holding tray, and a clear dome. Previously used planting flats and containers should be disinfected with 1 part bleach/10 parts water.

When choosing what to plant, remember some seeds produce better when sown directly in the soil once it warms up. Other seeds require soaking or chilling before planting. Always read the back of the seed envelope for details.

Planting
First, lightly moisten your Seed Starter mix. Fill containers about two-thirds full and tap the container to settle the potting mix. Gently pat firm. Drop seeds & cover to a depth specified on the seed package. Small seeds can be sprinkled lightly. Count out larger seeds and plant with at least three seeds per container (not all seeds will germinate and you will be thinning later). Label your plants as you plant the seeds (Labelling makes a gardener’s life easier). Mist, sprinkle with water, or set containers into a tray with some water in the bottom so the mix wicks up the moisture from below. Do NOT let mix get soggy.

You can loosely cover the flats or pots with plastic wrap or a dome to keep in some humidity. The plastic should NOT be air tight or you will promote mildew — which is not good.  If you use a plastic bag or plastic sheet, cut up straws, toothpicks, or bamboo skewers can help keep the plastic up off the soil.

When things sprout
At the first signs of seedlings, take off plastic, remove any heating mats, and expose to fluorescent shop lights. Here in Seattle we don’t get the 12 to 18 hours of daylight these seedlings need. Even with a fully southern, bright sunny window, set up a fluorescent bulb lighting system. You need to provide 12 to 18 hours of light. Suspend the lights  no more than two inches above the plants. As the plants grow, be sure to move the lights up so the plants do NOT touch the bulbs (they will burn!). A hook-n-chain system can  help with this. Turn the planting trays every other day or so keeps the plants from leaning too much and getting all spindly — which is not good. If you can remember to switch the lights on and off, a light timer is an indulgence. For most of us, it is the best thing ever.

Water consistently. Don’t let your seedlings dry out, but don’t let them be soggy either. Try to use room temperature to lukewarm water. Begin to fertilize your seedlings once they get their first “True leaves.” (“True leaves” emerge after the cute, round cotyledon leaves.) If you can, a couple times a day, lightly ruffle seedlings that have grown their true leaves — it helps them grow strong. Apply the first dose of fertilizer at half the recommended strength. Then fertilize at two-week intervals with the dilution recommended by the manufacturer.

Re-potting
As seedlings outgrow their containers or get crowded, thin out the weak ones by snipping them off, then carefully repot them into larger containers with a mix that includes compost.  Pulling them up can disturb the roots of the seedling you intend to keep.

Hardening off
For a week or two before the plants go outside, start acclimating them. On a warm day move the plants to a shady spot for increasing lengths of time. Gradually increase the amount of time they spend outside and the amount of sunlight they receive. Bring them in or cover them if the temperature dips.

Leave the plants outside the night before transplanting. Water seedlings well before and after transplanting. Try to transplant on a cloudy day if possible.

 

When do you get _________ in your store?

Garden items Arrival in store
• Ed Hume Flower & Vegetable seed rack**
• Irish Eyes Organic Garden Seeds
early January
Summer blooming bulbs – plant in spring
(can include anemone, begonias, dahlias, gladilolas, iris, lily, ranunculus)
Late February
Asparagus crowns March
Onion sets Mid February to mid March
Potato seeds Early to mid March
Ladybugs Late March/early April
Nematods Late March/early April

Seeds we typically offer, include:

Artichokes • Asters • Basil • Beets • Bok Choy • Broccoli • Green beans (bush or pole) • Brussel Sprouts • Chinese cabbage • Chicory/Endive • Cabbage • Cannas • Cantaloupe • Carrots • Cauliflower • Celery • Chives • Cilantro • Collards • Corn • Cosmos • Cucumber • Dianthus • Dill • Eggplant • Fennel • Fuchsias • Geraniums • Impatiens • Kale • Leek • Lettuce • Marigolds • Mustard • Okra • Onions (from seed) • Peas (bush or pole) • Radishes • Radishes (Daikon) • Summer Squash • Oregano • Pansies • Parsley • Parsnips • Peppers • Petunias • Pumpkin • Radicchio • Sage • Snapdragons • Snow Peas • Spinach • Squash • Stock • Sunflowers • Sweet Peas • Swiss Chard • Thyme • Tomatilloes • Tomatoes • Turnips • Watermelon • Zinnias

 

Click here for printable Springtime Seasonal Checklist

SUMMERTIME Checklists June/July/August

Click for printable Summertime Checklist

Summertime Home/Lawn/Garden issues & maintenance:

checkoff-box  Exterior paint & prep

checkoff-box  Furnace filter change every three months

checkoff-box  Water filters (sink, refrigerator, shower): change as necessary and directed

checkoff-box  September is Nat’l Preparedness month: Disaster kit review∞

checkoff-box  Clean/repair gutters & downspouts

checkoff-box  Repair screen windows & doors

checkoff-box  Replace broken window glass panes

checkoff-box  Inspect & repair roof damage

checkoff-box  Seal attic and crawl space cracks and gaps

checkoff-box  Porch and deck cleaning, repairing, painting, and staining

checkoff-box  We’ll sharpen your garden tools or replace with new

checkoff-box  We’ll sharpen your lawn mower blade

checkoff-box  Weed control in lawn & garden beds

checkoff-box  Lawn care: as needed, aerate, dethatch, & overseed, early May

checkoff-box  Cultivate veggie beds: test your soil with a soil test kit and add compost, lime, fertilizer, manure, peat moss, coconut coir, as needed, to amend your garden soil

checkoff-box  Pruning: pines, flowering trees, lilac (just after bloom), & lavender (just after bloom) in May; wisteria, hedges, heathers, fuchsias, & lavender (immediately after bloom) in June; vines, deadwood, weak, & diseased branches in June/July; (tip pinch) vine berries after new growth is about 2 to 3 feet, usually in June/July; evergreens like junipers, cypress, & conifers in June/July/August; and berry canes that produced berries (down to the ground) from late June through November.

checkoff-box  Plant spring blooming flower bulbs (allium, amaryllis, crocus, daffodils, hyacinths, tulips), September through November

checkoff-box  Plant fall crop & over-wintering veggie seeds, late July thru early September

checkoff-box  Put out netting to protect ripening fruits and berries

Click for printable Summertime Checklist

To-do “tools” inventory checklist:

checkoff-box  Exterior paint & prep supplies*

checkoff-box  Interior paint & prep supplies*

checkoff-box  Furnace filters

checkoff-box  Box fans for ventilation

checkoff-box  Moss control: roofs, walks, yards

checkoff-box  Deck & fence stain

checkoff-box  Hand weeding tools, knee pads, gloves

checkoff-box  Soil test kit

checkoff-box  Dolomite Lime for lawns, if necessary (raises pH to 6 or 7)

checkoff-box  Lawn fertilizer w/moss control, organic lawn fertilizer

checkoff-box  Organic garden flower & vegetable fertilizer

checkoff-box  Rose fertilizer (also good for lilacs)

checkoff-box  Pruners

checkoff-box  Ladybugs for aphids control

checkoff-box  Nematodes for crane fly larva control

checkoff-box  Sluggo Slug Bait

checkoff-box  Netting for berry vines

checkoff-box  Plant stakes

checkoff-box  Tomato cages

Canning supplies†

Click for printable Summertime Checklist

When do you get _________ in your store?

Garden items Arrival in store
Cover crop September
• Ed Hume Flower & Vegetable seed rack**
• Irish Eyes Organic Garden Seeds
early January
Fall Bulbs – plant in fall: bloom in spring
(allium, amaryllis, daffodils, tulips, crocus, hyacinth)
September
Ladybugs Late March/
Early April
Nematods Late March/
Early April

Seeds we typically offer, include:

Artichokes • Asters • Basil • Beets • Bok Choy • Broccoli • Green beans (bush or pole) • Brussel Sprouts • Chinese cabbage • Chicory/Endive • Cabbage • Cannas • Cantaloupe • Carrots • Cauliflower • Celery • Chives • Cilantro • Collards • Corn • Cosmos • Cucumber • Dianthus • Dill • Eggplant • Fennel • Fuchsias • Geraniums • Impatiens • Kale • Leek • Lettuce • Marigolds • Mustard • Okra • Onions (from seed) • Peas (bush or pole) • Radishes • Radishes (Daikon) • Summer Squash • Oregano • Pansies • Parsley • Parsnips • Peppers • Petunias • Pumpkin • Radicchio • Sage • Snapdragons • Snow Peas • Spinach • Squash • Stock • Sunflowers • Sweet Peas • Swiss Chard • Thyme • Tomatilloes • Tomatoes • Turnips • Watermelon • Zinnias

Fall & over winter selections

Cabbage • Chives • Parsley • Shallots • Swiss Chard

Click for printable Summertime Checklist

AUTUMN Checklists (September/October/November)

Click for printable Autumn Seasonal Checklist

Autumn Home/Lawn/Garden issues & maintenance:

checkoff-box  Interior paint & prep*

checkoff-box  Exterior paint completion — cold weather is coming!

checkoff-box  Daylight savings in November: change smoke and carbon monoxide detector batteries

checkoff-box  Furnace filter change every three months

checkoff-box  Water filters (sink, refrigerator, shower): change as necessary and directed

checkoff-box  Seal attic and crawl space cracks and gaps

checkoff-box  Brick & mortar repair for chimneys, exterior walls, etc.

checkoff-box  Check for moisture in your basement

checkoff-box  Is your sump pump working?

checkoff-box  Repair screen windows & doors in early fall.

checkoff-box  Replace broken window glass panes in early fall.

checkoff-box  Inspect & repair roof damage

checkoff-box  Clean/repair gutters & downspouts

checkoff-box  Porch/deck cleaning, repairing, painting, & staining, early fall

checkoff-box  Disconnect hoses from faucets; protect with a faucet cover

checkoff-box  Prepare for freezing, ice, & snow: check your stock of ice melt, faucet covers, snow shovels, etc.

checkoff-box  Sharpen your garden tools for winter pruning

checkoff-box  Lawn care: Apply fall/winter fertilizer, and, as needed, aerate, dethatch, & overseed in October/November

checkoff-box  Plant spring blooming flower bulbs (allium, amaryllis, crocus, daffodils, hyacinths, tulips), September through November.

checkoff-box  Weed control in garden beds

checkoff-box  Add compost, lime, as necessary, to all growing garden beds in early fall.

checkoff-box  Plant last fall crop and over-wintering veggie seeds in early September; plant cover crop in dormant veggie gardens from September through mid-November

checkoff-box  Lay down a layer of compost or mulch to blanket over bare dirt garden areas from late September through October

checkoff-box  Make hydrangeas pink by applying Dolomitic Lime or Triple Super Phosphate in October/November – pink hydrangeas like alkaline soil (pH of 6 to 7)

checkoff-box  Make hydrangeas blue with an application of Aluminum Sulfate in October/November (and March/April) – blue hydrangeas like acid soil (pH of 4.0 to 5.5)

checkoff-box  Pruning: berry canes that produced(down to the ground) from late June through November; bush type roses that had black spot this year in October/November; and stone fruits in late November.

 Click for printable Autumn Seasonal Checklist

 

To-do “tools” Inventory checklist:

checkoff-box  Exterior paint & prep supplies*

checkoff-box  Interior paint & prep supplies*

checkoff-box  Batteries for Daylight Savings change

checkoff-box  Furnace filters

checkoff-box  Space heaters

checkoff-box  Pipe wrap insulation

checkoff-box  Exterior window/door caulking

checkoff-box  Weather stripping

checkoff-box  Seal attic and crawl space cracks and gaps

checkoff-box  Faucet covers

checkoff-box  Ice melt

checkoff-box  Snow shovels

checkoff-box  Ice scrapers

checkoff-box  Hand & foot warmer packs

checkoff-box  Sleds & Saucers

checkoff-box  Lube locks with graphite (doors, padlocks, auto, etc)

checkoff-box  Moss control for yards & roofs

checkoff-box  Deck & fence stain – finish up in September before the cold weather sets in.

checkoff-box  Dolomite Lime for lawns, if necessary (raises pH to 6 or 7)

checkoff-box  Winter fertilizer for lawn

checkoff-box  Rakes for lawn and garden

checkoff-box  Lawn bags

checkoff-box  Hand weeding tools, knee pads, gloves

checkoff-box  Pruners

checkoff-box  Compost/mulch for garden beds

checkoff-box  Spring bulbs (allium, amaryllis, crocus, daffodils, hyacinths, tulips)

checkoff-box  Canning supplies†

 

When do you get _________ in your store?

Garden items Arrival in store
Cover crop September
• Ed Hume Flower & Vegetable seed rack**
• Irish Eyes Organic Garden Seeds
early January
Fall Bulbs – plant in fall: bloom in spring
(allium, amaryllis, daffodils, tulips, crocus, hyacinth)
September

 

Seeds we typically offer that are good for either fall crops or overwintering:

Cabbage • Chives • Parsley • Shallots • Swiss Chard • Carrots • Mustard • Radishes • Spinach • Turnips

Click for printable Autumn Seasonal Checklist

WINTERTIME Checklists (November/December/January)

Click for printable Wintertime Checklist

Wintertime Home/Lawn/Garden issues & maintenance:

checkoff-box  Interior paint & prep work*
checkoff-box  Daylight savings in November: change smoke and carbon monoxide detector batteries
checkoff-box  Furnace filter change every three months
checkoff-box  Water filters (sink, refrigerator, shower): change as necessary and directed
checkoff-box  Seal attic and crawl space cracks and gaps
checkoff-box  Brick & mortar repair for chimneys, exterior walls, etc.
checkoff-box  Check for moisture in your basement
checkoff-box  Is your sump pump working?
checkoff-box  Disconnect outside hoses from faucets; protect bib with a faucet cover
checkoff-box  Compost mulch on garden beds
checkoff-box  Plant spring blooming flower bulbs (allium, amaryllis, crocus, daffodils, hyacinths, tulips) from September through November
checkoff-box  Plant cover crop in dormant veggie gardens in November
checkoff-box  Make hydrangeas pink with an application of Dolomitic Lime or Triple Super Phosphate in October/November – pink hydrangeas like alkaline soil (pH of 6 to 7)
checkoff-box  Make hydrangeas blue with an application of Aluminum Sulfate in October/November (and March/April) – blue hydrangeas like acid soil (pH of 4.0 to 5.5)
checkoff-box  Lawn care: Apply fall/winter lawn fertilizer, in October/November and — as necessary — aerate, dethatch, and overseed in October/November (or early spring)
checkoff-box  Pruning throughout yard: bush type roses that had black spot this year in October/November; roses, clematis, vine berries, lilac suckers, fruit trees, shade trees, and perennials in January; and stone fruits from late November to early January.

Click for printable Wintertime Checklist

Wintertime “tools” checklist:

checkoff-box  Interior paint & prep supplies*
checkoff-box  Batteries for Daylight Savings change
checkoff-box  Furnace filters
checkoff-box  Space heaters
checkoff-box  Pipe wrap insulation
checkoff-box  Exterior window/door caulking
checkoff-box  Weather stripping
checkoff-box  Faucet covers
checkoff-box  Ice melt
checkoff-box  Snow shovels
checkoff-box  Ice scrapers
checkoff-box  Hand & foot warmer packs
checkoff-box  Sleds & Saucers
checkoff-box  Lube locks with graphite (doors, padlocks, auto, etc)
checkoff-box  Rakes for lawn and garden
checkoff-box  Moss control: roofs, walks, yards
checkoff-box  Lawn bags
checkoff-box  Winter fertilizer for lawn
checkoff-box  Compost/mulch and/or cover crop seed for garden beds
checkoff-box  Pruners

When do you get _________ in your store?

Garden items Arrival in store
• Ed Hume Flower & Vegetable seed rack
• Irish Eyes Organic Garden Seeds
early January
Spring Bulbs – plant in spring
(anemone, begonias, dahlias, gladiolas, iris, lily, ranunculus)
Late February
Onion sets Mid February

Seeds we typically offer that are good for either fall crops or overwintering:

Cabbage • Chives • Parsley • Shallots • Swiss Chard • Carrots • Mustard • Radishes • Spinach • Turnips

Click for printable Wintertime Checklist

An emergency preparedness supplies kit
A collection of basic items a family may need in the event of an emergency or natural disaster. It sounds logical, but the best way to be prepared is to put together these supplies before an emergency. You may have to evacuate at a moment’s notice and take essentials with you. You will probably not have time to search for or acquire the supplies you need.

Emergency Preparedness

You may need to survive on your own after an emergency. This means having your own food, water, and other supplies in sufficient quantity to last for at least 72 hours. Local officials and relief workers may be on the scene after a disaster but they cannot reach everyone immediately. Outside help can arrive in hours or it can take days. Additionally, basic services such as electricity, gas, water, sewage treatment, and telephones may be cut off for days, a week, or even longer. Think about these things and how you and your family will cope. Your supplies kit should contain items to help you manage during these outages.

List sources include The Seattle Times, Seattle Emergency Management, Washington Emergency Management, and Federal Emergency Management.

 

Duct tape Aisle 3
Toilet paper Aisle 5
Broom Aisle 5
Large plastic trash bags East wall at end of aisle 6
Portable radio Aisle 7
Candles Aisle 7
Shovel East wall at end of aisles 10/11
Axe East wall at end of aisles 11/12
Sledgehammer East wall at end of aisles 11/12
Camp stove & fuel Aisle 11
Lite Sticks East wall at end of aisle 12
Flashlights Aisle 12
Can opener Aisle 6 or East wall at end of aisle 12
First Aid Kit East wall at end of aisle 12
Waterproof matches East wall at end of aisle 12
A loud whistle East wall at end of aisle 12
Rain poncho East wall at end of aisle 12
Handwarmers East wall at end of aisle 12
Dustmask, N95 rated East wall at end of aisle 2
Crowbar Aisle 16
Handsaw Aisle 16
Eye-safety goggles East wall at end of aisle 2
Tarps Service Table area (just past aisle 18)
Fire extinguisher Aisle 17
Plastic boxes Aisle 17
Gas shut-off wrench East wall at end of aisle 19
Pocketknife Front counter
Extra batteries Main aisle
Work gloves Main aisle
Rope Aisle 23 in corner
RELATED ITEMS for preventable actions
Earthquake/Museum putty Aisle 3
Non-skid rubber shelf liner Aisle 7
Water heater restraints East wall at end of aisle 20
Velcro patches Aisle 23
Foundation tie-downs Aisle 23

Printable Disaster Prep list
Printable Seattle Times Preparedness Guide

 

 

frog  

 

When visiting our store, keep an eye out for our frog —
      You’ll find him next to the price tags of our earth-friendly products.

Green Items - Save the planet!

If you can’t buy a Prius, why not try a sampling of the greenest of the green products we carry every day.

Paint
Mythic paint Paint counter
Paint hardener (for old latex) Paint counter
Krylon H20 (water-based spray paint) Aisle 4
Ace Deck & Siding stain Aisle 1
Cleaning/Household
All purpose cleaner (Mrs. Meyers, Holy Cow, Green Works, Simple Green, Seventh Generation, Goo Gone, Chomp!, Peroxide, white vinegar) Aisle 5
Glass cleaner (Mrs. Meyers) Aisle 5
Surface cleaner/wipes (Mrs. Meyers, Seventh Generation) Aisle 5
Floor cleaner (Bona) Main aisle
Dish soap (Mrs. Meyers, Seventh Generation) Aisle 5
Bathroom (Seventh Generation) Aisles 5, 19
Laundry detergent/bleach (Mrs. Meyers, Seventh Generation) Aisle 5
Odors (Fresh Wave, Nature’s Miracle) Main aisle, Aisle 5
Cleaner Pad (Scotch Brite) Aisle 5
House wash (Krud Kutter) Main aisle
Car wash, biodegradeable (No. 7) Aisle 12
Auto cleaner/degreaser (Simple Green) Aisle 5, 12
Pets
Pet stain remover (Nature’s Miracle) Main aisle, 5
Organic cat nip Main aisle
Organic dog cookies Main aisle
Repellent, cat/dog/critters (Ro-Pel) Aisle 10
Garden
Repellent, cat/dog/critters (Ro-Pel) Aisle 10
Weed prevention/grass killer (Burnout, Concern, corn gluten, Garden Safe, Whitney Farms) Aisle 10
Fertilizers/Foods (Alaska Fish Fertilizer, Alaska organics, Jobes organics, Whitney Farms organics, Biotone) Aisle 9
Potting soil (Whitney Farms, Cedar Grove, Miracle Gro) Aisle 9
Peat pots/pellets Aisle 9
Mulch (Beats Peat, Miracle Mulch, Mulch Block) Aisle 9
Compost (Ace, Cedar Grove, Whitney Farms) Aisle 9
Weed pullers East Wall, at the end of aisle 9
Fugicide, mold, mildew (Safer, Concrobium, Garden Safe, Bonide) Aisles 10, 5
Pest Control
Moss & algae killer (Safer, Worry Free) Aisle 10
Slug bait & traps (Sluggo) Aisle 10
Insect prevention/killer spray/soap/traps Aisle 10
Moths – clothes, pantry (Safer, Biocare) Aisle 10
Boric Acid Aisle 10
Other
Biodegradeable bags (BioBags, EcoSafe, paper) East Wall, at the end of aisle 6
Cloth shopping bags Aisle 4
Drain opener, enzyme (Drain Care, Roebic) Aisle 19
Drain opener, manual (Drain Sticks) Aisle 19
Compact fluorescent bulbs Aisle 13
Rechargeable batteries (NiMH) Main aisle
Battery charger (NiMH/NiCad) Main aisle
Flashlight, windup crank Aisle 12

Click for printable list of Green Items